Assess yourself 01.12.2017

Answer the following questions in 200 words:

  1. The growing sexual offences against children pose serious challenges before the future of development in India. Discuss some of the institutional steps taken so far to meet them.
  2. Protectionism has been given much focus, especially by big nations in the recent times. Does it mean that the rate of deglobalisation has increased?

Answers may be hand-written and posted in the comments section or typed as a comment for review.

7 thoughts on “Assess yourself 01.12.2017

  1. piyush poddar says:

    Children are considered to be future human resource or dividends of the country provided they are equipped with quality education,health and an environment of equality. The recent data from the National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) show that more than 100,000 crimes against children were reported in 2016, of which close to a third were sexual crimes such as rape, molestation, and exploitation for pornography. This clearly brings out the picture of regressive attitude of society towards child development which pose challenges for inclusive growth in India
    Some of the institutional steps taken by government are:
    1-The Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act, 2000, as the principal legislation for the protection of children. The Act was amended in 2015 to ensure better care and protection for children.

    2-The Protection of Children from Sexual Offences Act, 2012” to protect all children under the age of 18 years from the offences of sexual assault, sexual harassment and pornography

    3-National Commission for Protection of Child Rights (NCPCR) was established in 2007, under the Commissions for Protection of Child Rights (CPCR) Act, 2005. This is a major step towards the protection of rights of children in the country.

    4-India recently ratified two core Conventions of I ILO on child labour – a global commitment to end the worst form of child labour and minimum age convention.

    5-Adoption of the Rights of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act, 2009. The Act provides for free and compulsory education to all children between 6-14 years of age.

    Several research has shown the relationship between women empowerment and child development. Further a proactive approach to child’s development is critical to INDIA’S using its future dividends as a resource

  2. piyush poddar says:

    Children are considered to be future human resource or dividends of the country provided they are equipped with quality education,health and an environment of equality. The recent data from the National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) show that more than 100,000 crimes against children were reported in 2016, of which close to a third were sexual crimes such as rape, molestation This clearly brings out the picture of regressive attitude of society towards child development which pose challenges for inclusive growth in India

    Some of the institutional steps taken by government are:

    1-The Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act, 2000, as the principal legislation for the protection of children. The Act was amended in 2015 to ensure better care and protection for children.

    2-The Protection of Children from Sexual Offences Act, 2012” to protect all children under the age of 18 years from the offences of sexual assault, sexual harassment
    3-National Commission for Protection of Child Rights (NCPCR) was established in 2007, is a major step towards the protection of rights of children in the country.

    4-India recently ratified two core Conventions of I ILO on child labour – a global commitment to end the worst form of child labour and minimum age convention.

    5-Adoption of the Rights of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act, 2009. The Act provides for free and compulsory education to all children between 6-14 years of age.

    Several research has shown the relationship between women empowerment and child development. Further a proactive approach to child’s development is critical to INDIA’S using its future dividends as a resource

  3. piyush poddar says:

    Q-Protectionism has been given much focus, especially by big nations in the recent times. Does it mean that the rate of deglobalisation has increased?

    ANSWER-The idea of protectionism has been inspired from the merchantalist era where countries in order to gain from exports(flow of gold to export surplus country) placed heavy tariffs on imports.The recent wave of protectionism seems to be motivated by political considerations rather than economic considerations.This can be seen in the rise of right wing political parties across Europe and Brexit taking place at the same time.
    Countries which benefited from the first wave of Globalisation ending with first World War are at the helm of such inward policies.It is driven by following considerations-
    1-Rise in heterogeneity in the society due to large influx of migrants.
    2-The benefit of domestic policies or development (rise in wages) is being leveraged by outsiders thereby leading to loss of jobs for the residents of home country.
    3-In order to give protection to the domestic industries and create jobs for home country

    Countries like India and China who have benefited from the second wave of globalisation which started in 1980s, have been promoting globalisation both at the international and global platforms. This can be seen with the opening up of Indian economy by reducing the FDI limits in various sectors and the initiation of Belt and Road Initiative by China.Since this wave of protectionism is driven solely by political considerations and not as a economic backlash against globalisation , it cannot be said that the rate of deglobalisation has increased. Knowing the economic benefits that accrue from globalisation countries all over the world are working on opening up their economies.
    According to Amartya Sen “Globalisation per se is not wrong but the unequal distribution of benefits of globalisation is the major culprit”. Therefore countries must work to leverage the potential benefits of globalisation by providing heath and education facilities ( enhancing capabilities) instead of closing their economies.

    • CBP Srivastava says:

      Protectionist policies are practised by most of the big nations outside Europe also. Mention in brief about them too. Further as you have written that it is due to political consideration you should briefly explain it also. Over all good attempt. Keep on writing

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